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Red-figure pottery

Page history last edited by Jenna Filardi 12 years, 10 months ago

Everett Wolf and William Sealy

 

History of Red-figure Pottery

 

  • Red-Figure was started around the end of the 6th century. It became popular because the people of Greece were tired of using Black-figure, so they used Red-figure. (Stokstad)
  • It was probably created by the Andokides painter, and was most popular from 530-500 B.C. (McPhee)
    • The Andokides Painter was an anonymous painter that was a pupil of Exekias, a very famous black-figure painter.

 

 

General Information

  • Red-figure is made to be the reverse of Black-figure pottery. Black-figure is where the main object in the painting is painted black with a red background. Red-figure is just red figures with a black background and black details in the figures. (Stokstad)
  • Initially, white and reddish-purple were used for the details, but that changed to black. (McPhee)

 

 

 

Ajax draggs Cassandra away from the statue of the goddess at which she had taken refuge Lycurgus Painter. Red figure pottery, c. 370-360 BC http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Mythology/Images/AjaxCassandra.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attic Red-figure

  • Attic Red-figure is just Red-figure but from Athens.
  • Regarded as the 'highest achievement of Greek vase painting." and has dominated other fine pottery in the markets throughout history.
  • There was a time when Attic Red-figure was not produced (330-320 BC) because the Macedonians had control of the city at that time. (McPhee)

 

 

         

Heracles and Iphicles

(Heracles strangling two snakes in the crib)

Red figure pottery, 470 BC

Musée du Louvre, Paris http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.timelessmyths.com/classical/gallery/iphicles.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.timelessmyths.com/classical/heracles.html&usg=__IhJyYIDJJQob15Nj2peji4nXdew=&h=500&w=331&sz=55&hl=en&start=23&tbnid=GtChZlS2vf1T_M:&tbnh=130&tbnw=86&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dred-figure%2Bpottery%26start%3D21%26gbv%3D2%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Doff%26sa%3DN

  

 

 

 

 

Bibliography

     McPhee, Ian. "Greece, ancient, red-figure pottery." Oxford Art Online. 2 Jan.

     2008. Oxford University Press. 5 Dec. 2008

     <http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/

     T034254pg15?q=red-figure+pottery&search=quick&pos=1&_start=1#firsthit>.

 

Cohen, Beth. "Vase painters, §II: Andokides Painter." Oxford Art Online. Oxford

     UP. 8 Dec. 2008 <http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/

     art/T088074pg10?q=Andokides&search=quick&pos=1&_start=1#firsthit>.

 

     Stokstad, Marilyn. Art A breif History. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson,

     2007.

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